The JSW Post Mortem_

At the end of a project it is important for the project manager and team members to conduct a post mortem. A project post Mortem consists of reviewing errors committed in the project and developing a list of the lessons learned from mistakes. In this blog post, we will be discussing briefly, a few observations made in the JSW project post mortem. The purpose of the JSW (job search workshop) project was to provide job searching related tools and resources for community/attendees that were looking for a job. The JSW project was carefully planned by the team members and project managers. I was assigned as one of the project managers. Most JSW project team members, are professionals in the human resources field.
At the end of the workshop, I distributed a list of questions for all team members and project managers. The list of questions consisted on processes or activities, which contributed to the JSW workshop’s success and/or failure. A week after the workshop, we met to celebrate the workshop success and to review the workshop survey results or “Lessons Learned”. To conclude the celebration along with the post mortem we reviewed the following:
• What processes, or activities did we include in the project that contributed to the JSW success?
The number one activity that made the JSW project to be a success was to have employers present during the workshop hiring for those participants who were ready with a professional resume on hand.
• What processes or activities did we include in the project that might have made the JSW project more successful?
We underestimated the number of people ready to look for a job with a resume on hand. Even though, we had a workshop registration process in place. Being a community event, we overlook the participants that showed up without registering. Only workshop registered participants, were able to interview during the workshop. We had fifty six attendees that were not able to interview, due to lack of interviewers and job offers. Indeed, attendees’ positive feedback and number of participants confirms that The JSW Project was a success. However, I strongly believe that a more complete community feasibility study would have assisted to a more successful JSW project.

Resources:
Greer, M. (2010). The project management minimalist: Just enough PM to rock your projects! (Laureate custom ed.). Baltimore: Laureate Education, Inc.

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4 thoughts on “

  1. Jacqueline,
    Thank you for sharing your story on the outcome of your team’s project. After reading your post, I came to the following conclusions. You stated, “We underestimated the number of people ready to look for a job with on hand. Even though, we had a workshop registration process in place. Being a community event, we overlook at the participants that showed up without registering”. Did you’ll complete a thorough analysis phase before you began the project? That phase might have shown you a complete “learner profile and description of constraints” to aid in a detailed pre-assessment of the possible outcome (McGriff, 2000). But, I am aware, from experience that working with community events where the price for the consumer is free, that the planner will never really have an accurate count of how many people will show up.

    McGriff, S., (2000). Instructional System Design (ISD): Using the ADDIE Model. Instructional Systems, College of Education, Penn State University. Retrieved from: https://www.lib.purdue.edu/sites/default/files/directory/butler38/ADDIE.pdf

    1. Carlton,

      I thank you for your reply. The analysis phase was done before the event and we had an idea of the approximate number of attendees However, as you stated “an accurate count of how many people will be attending on free events is not possible”. Indeed, it is easier to have an accurate count of people, after the event.

  2. Hi Jacqueline,
    Funny you mention underestimating the number of people looking for a job with a resume on hand. We had a job fair this year and had exactly the same problem as you. Many people were stuck outside in temperatures reaching 40 degrees Celsius. I doubt the powers that be will underestimate again.

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